Guanacaste

This area is the most important nesting ground for the green sea turtle in the Western Caribbean. During the summer months (July - September), thousands of turtles come ashore along these world-famous beaches to lay their eggs. Often called "Costa Rica's Amazon", Tortuguero is a navigable network of lakes and channels that crosses this National Park and allows a great diversity of fauna and flora to be observed close at hand. It is possible to observe iguana basking in trees, monkeys and sloths in the forest canopy, and the raphia palm with the largest leaves of any plant.

The province of Guanacaste covers most of Nicoya Peninsula in the northwestern part of the country, which borders the Pacific Ocean. It has over 200 miles of coastline with more that seventy different beaches, several of Costa Rica's famous national parks, spectacular lakes and volcanoes, great fishing and diving spots. In fact, over one third of all national parks and wildlife reserves existing in Costa Rica are in Guanacaste, including turtle nesting sites, refuges for migrating birds, spectacular caves and the largest protected tropical dry forest in the world. Guanacaste experiences little rain and consistently high temperatures from November to April, allowing visitors to enjoy the beautiful beaches.  From May to October, the climate is similar to that of San Jose, consisting of daily showers and moderate temperatures.

 

Travel to Guanacaste

There are various ways to travel to Guanacaste (bus, air, private transportation, taxi, or ferry) depending on your destination and place of departure. Liberia, the capital of Guanacaste, is home to the country's second largest aiport, which welcomes abroad visitors daily.  

There are buses, which run from downtown San Jose to the following destinations in Guanacaste: Santa Rosa National Park, Tamarindo, Liberia, Tilaran, Cañas, and Golfo de Papagayo. Prices and schedules vary accordingly; contact the bus providers and be sure to purchase tickets in-person and in advance of your trip.